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How to Grow Coral Bells Plant Outdoors

Updated: December 24, 2022

Coral bells, also known as Heuchera, are a perennial plant that is commonly grown for their attractive foliage and delicate flowers. They are native to North America and have become a popular choice for gardeners due to their low maintenance and versatility. If you want to grow coral bells plant outdoors, here’s everything you need to know.

Choosing the Right Location

Coral bells prefer a location that receives partial shade, especially during the hottest parts of the day. They can tolerate full sun in cooler climates but may struggle in hot and humid environments. The soil should be moist but well-draining, with a pH level between 6.0 and 7.0.

Planting Coral Bells

Coral bells can be planted in early spring or early fall. Before planting, prepare the soil by removing any weeds, rocks, or debris. Dig a hole twice as wide as the root ball and slightly deeper than the container. Gently loosen the roots and place the plant in the hole, making sure the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. Backfill the hole with soil and water thoroughly.

Watering and Fertilizing

Coral bells require consistent moisture to thrive but do not like to be waterlogged. Water deeply once a week, or more frequently during hot and dry weather. Mulching around the base of the plant can help retain moisture and suppress weeds.

Fertilize coral bells with a balanced fertilizer in early spring before new growth appears. Avoid fertilizing in late summer or fall, as this can encourage soft growth that is more susceptible to winter damage.

Pruning and Maintenance

Coral bells are relatively low maintenance but benefit from occasional pruning to promote new growth and maintain their shape. Remove any dead or damaged leaves throughout the growing season, and cut back any leggy stems to encourage bushier growth.

In late fall, cut back the foliage to about an inch above the soil level. This helps protect the plant from winter damage and promotes healthy growth in the spring.

Propagation

Coral bells can be propagated by division in early spring or early fall. Carefully dig up the plant and separate the root ball into smaller sections, making sure each section has at least one healthy stem and root system. Replant the divisions in a prepared bed or container and water thoroughly.

Common Problems

Coral bells are generally resistant to pests and diseases, but they can still encounter some problems. Here are a few issues to look out for:

  • Crown rot: This fungal disease can cause the plant to wilt and die. To prevent crown rot, make sure the soil is well-draining and avoid overwatering.
  • Leaf spot: This fungal disease causes brown spots on the leaves. Remove any infected leaves and avoid overhead watering.
  • Aphids: These small insects can suck the sap from the leaves, causing stunted growth and distorted foliage. Treat with insecticidal soap or neem oil.

FAQ

1. Can coral bells grow in full sun?

Coral bells prefer partial shade but can tolerate full sun in cooler climates. In hot and humid environments, they may struggle in full sun.

2. How often should I water coral bells?

Water deeply once a week, or more frequently during hot and dry weather. Make sure the soil is moist but not waterlogged.

3. When should I fertilize coral bells?

Fertilize coral bells with a balanced fertilizer in early spring before new growth appears. Avoid fertilizing in late summer or fall.

4. How do I propagate coral bells?

Coral bells can be propagated by division in early spring or early fall. Carefully dig up the plant and separate the root ball into smaller sections, making sure each section has at least one healthy stem and root system.

5. What are some common problems with coral bells?

Coral bells are generally resistant to pests and diseases, but they can still encounter crown rot, leaf spot, and aphids.